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Ducks Unlimited Canada Podcast

The official podcast of Ducks Unlimited Canada. Listen as we explore issues, ideas and research about wetlands in Canada. Wetlands are some of the most bio-diverse habitats in the country. Wetlands are vital to the health of a wide variety of mammals, birds, amphibians reptiles plants - and, of course human beings. We'll be interviewing research experts and frontline workers from Ducks Unlimited Canada in lively, engaging exchanges. They'll keep you up-to-date and up-to-speed on the best information and stories about these vital Canadian ecosystems.
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Now displaying: February, 2019

 

We're all about wetlands. Jump in.

Feb 5, 2019

This episode begins with an engraving that was tucked into the corner of a 18th century map of North America, a beaver map. The engraving depicts an almost Hieronymus Bosch-like scene. One that’s a psychedelic, fever dream of beavers in Canada. In the background a bifurcated Niagara Falls tumbled into a broad river. In the mid- and foregrounds are rodentesque creatures, dozens of them. These are part beaver, part bear, part human animals that have the orderliness and industry of a work crew of navvies.

Some carry logs on their shoulders like the seven dwarfs hefting shovels, some carry cowpats of mortar on their tails. Others seem to be barking orders from neatly constructed ramps. The beavers, an inscription on the engraving tells us, are building a Great Lake through their organized labour.

Beaver Map

To understand that map, and beavers' relationship with the landscape I spoke with Glynnis Hood, a professor of environmental science at the University of Alberta, Augustana Campus.

Glynnis is a beaver expert. She’s studied the big-toothed rodents impact on the Canadian landscape. She’s especially interested in how its industry and ingenuity has keep water on the land, even in times of drought. And, how its ecological engineering has created and maintained wetlands for centuries.

Ducks Unlimited Canada folks, like many Canadians, have a relationship with the beaver that is, well, complicated. As Glynnis will explain, the fur trade almost wiped out the entire population castor condensis, our native species of the rodent. In the late 1930s Ducks Unlimited wanted to enlist beavers as ecological good soldiers. It encouraged a beaver comeback, that was pretty successful. But these days, loggers, folks in the oil and gas industry and cottagers have seen the reborn beaver populations flood their lands and thwart their industries. 

Even Ducks Unlimited Canada researchers find their wetland water control efforts confounded by busy beavers.

I spoke with Glynnis about all of that, and how Canadians can best make peace with our little rodent friends.

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