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Ducks Unlimited Canada Podcast

The official podcast of Ducks Unlimited Canada. Listen as we explore issues, ideas and research about wetlands in Canada. Wetlands are some of the most bio-diverse habitats in the country. Wetlands are vital to the health of a wide variety of mammals, birds, amphibians reptiles plants - and, of course human beings. We'll be interviewing research experts and frontline workers from Ducks Unlimited Canada in lively, engaging exchanges. They'll keep you up-to-date and up-to-speed on the best information and stories about these vital Canadian ecosystems.
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We're all about wetlands. Jump in.

Aug 1, 2017

The Rundown

Eider feathers, or down, aren't just for duvets. In fact, a hormone in those feathers called corticosterone, can indicate the stress eider ducks have been under as they molt. Yukon-based eider researcher Jane Harms explains that stress can be due to nearby predators or sometimes changes in their environment. So, not only can the stress hormone indicate eiders' health and their ability to reproduce, it may also be an indicator of climate change. Get under cover and tune into the tale.

Wetlands are delicate ecosystems. So the last thing researchers really want to do is churn up those wetland waters just to sample them. But what if a flying robot could do that for them? How? We do a flyby visit with a young inventor, Nathan Hoyt, who worked with a small team of high school students to figure it out. Plus, they're making a business out of it. Listen in. We promise we won't drone on.

Contact
Like to learn more about these topics and other aspects of wetlands conservation? You can at ducks.ca.

And, you can email your questions and feedback to communications@ducks.ca.

Guest Bios

Jane Harms is the program veterinarian with the Department of the Environment in Yukon.

Nathan Hoyt is a student at the Fredericton High School and is now a co-owner of  Eco Drone Water Collection. If you’d like to learn more about his fledgling company visit ecodronewatercollection.com

 

Jul 1, 2017

The Rundown
Why do maritime fish fight currents, waterfalls and man-made barriers to get to inland ponds and lakes to spawn? What barriers do they face? How does that odd behaviour help the ecology of wetlands? And, how can we make their job easier? We talk with Nic McLellan, the Atlantic Science Coordinator for Ducks Unlimited Canada to find out. Plus, we discover what tracking road race runners has to do with counting fish.

Did you know ducklings have their own social network? No spoilers, but you'll be amazed by how those little ducks make sure they all share the same birthday, thanks to a quick chat we had with Dave Howerter. He's the Director of National Conservation Operations at Ducks Unlimited Canada. Dave's up on the equivalent of bird Twitter.

Listen up.

Making Contact
Like to learn more about these topics and other aspects of wetlands conservation? You can at ducks.ca.

And, you can email your questions and feedback to communications@ducks.ca.

Guest Bios

Nic McLellan
Conservation Programs Specialist, Atlantic Canada

Nic McLellan grew up in Sackville, NB where he developed a keen interest in biology and the outdoors.

Prior to his current job at Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC), Nic worked on several research projects with the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources. These projects involved a variety of bird species including shorebirds, songbirds, seabirds, and waterfowl.

David Howerter, PhD
Director, National Conservation Operations

Dave Howerter is an accomplished scientist with a track record of successfully managing a complex scientific program, demonstrated ability to build teams, build consensus, and develop partnerships. Dave is responsible for all programs national in scope related to engineering, education, international partnerships, government relations, research and conservation planning.

 

 

Feb 1, 2017

The Rundown

This is the inaugural episode of the Ducks Unlimited Canada Podcast. Welcome. Let's dive right into the content pond.

In this episode you'll meet carp in a marsh and a researcher in the field.

First, the carp.

In it's heyday , the 1930s, the Delta Marsh, near Lake Manitoba, was home to a huge numbers of waterfowl. It was one of the great duck hunting destinations in North America. And, it attracted royalty, celebrities and hunters from all over the world. That was, before the carp. The invasive species muddied the marshes water, stirred up the bottom and generally made life miserable for the aquatic plants that called the marsh home. No plants, no ducks. Then scientists perfected the carp barrier and the marsh is bouncing back. You'll hear the story of a remarkable recovery.

Next we pay a short visit to Matt Dyson a University of Waterloo field researcher. He tells us what it's really like in the woods, bogs and muck of the north as he does the real, on the ground work of a deep woods scientist.

You'll find the bios of all the scientists we interviewed in this episode below.

Making Contact
Like to learn more about these topics and other aspects of wetlands restoration? You can at ducks.ca.

And, you can email your questions and feedback to communications@ducks.ca.

Guest Bios

Dale Wrubleski, PhD

Dale is Ducks Unlimited Canada’s lead research scientist at Delta Marsh. Trained as an entomologist, Wrubleski has more recently become an expert on native fish species and on the invasive carp that threaten the famed Manitoba wetland.


Glen Suggett
Glen grew up near the shores of Delta Marsh in the 1970s. Over the years, he’s seen the health of the iconic wetland deteriorate, as well as unsuccessful attempts to improve conditions. Rather than become discouraged, Suggett’s a part of the team working to restore Delta Marsh for the next generation. Together with Gordon Goldsborough, PhD, and members of the Delta History Group, Suggett authored Delta: A Prairie Marsh and its People, a book that introduces readers to the people who have relied on and enjoyed the marsh over the years.

Few people know the history of Manitoba’s Delta Marsh as intimately as Gordon Goldsborough, PhD. A Winnipeg-born research scientist and natural storyteller, Goldsborough’s connection to Delta dates back to his days as a student at the University of Manitoba. As a water quality specialist, and professor at his alma mater, Goldsborough enjoys sharing the many reasons why Delta Marsh is so important for people and wildlife.


Matt Dyson’s Twitter feed, much like his life, is anything but boring. The University of Waterloo student’s tweets alternate with images of cougars and ravens eating duck eggs. The photos of ravenous predators—captured by trail cameras—are part of Dyson’s ongoing doctoral research that takes him to northern Alberta each spring. While battling the landscape’s rugged elements, he’s studying the impact a changing boreal forest is having on predators—and in turn, on duck populations.

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