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In The Reeds: Canada's Conservation Podcast

Welcome to the official pod of Ducks Unlimited Canada. Thanks for reading this show bio. Look! You’re still reading it! As the name suggests, we get in the reeds about issues that intersect with the incredible, unpredictable, and ever-changing challenges of conservation. We want to make you think, we want to educate you, we want to inspire you, and we want you to feel like you belong with us. So, if you want to talk about our wild and weird world of wetlands, waterfowl, and wildlife – this is your podcast. Welcome home. (And yes, we talk about ducks too.) Hosted by Jennifer Sanford
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We're all about wetlands. Jump in.

Dec 16, 2019

Thirteen is the most unlucky of numbers, so it’s appropriate that this podcast is all about two unlucky wetland dwellers - the Northern Leopard frog and the Blanding’s turtle. Why unlucky?

Because both are in ecological trouble. The northern leopard frog is endangered in  parts of British Columbia, the Blanding’s turtle is threatened in Ontario.

Take the northern leopard frog. Its habitat, which the little guys are pretty fussy about, is shrinking, bullfrogs are invading from the U.S. and the leopard frog is prone to a nasty, lethal fungus. As we’ll learn, it takes a egg-cursion from B.C. to Calgary and back again, to put the little “not-easy-being-green” amphibians on the road to recovery. 

The Blanding’s turtle with it high, helmet back and yellow throat is a distinctive turtle. It’s also a long-lived meandering one that ranges across roads and ATV tracks as it moves to nesting grounds. But those grounds are shrinking and the turtles, which can live to 75 years old are threatened by predators, cars, ATVs and even by climate change.

Like ducks, both those fraught frogs and tenuous turtles live a good part of their lives in wetlands. So, as go the amphibians, perhaps, so goes the wetlands. 

To find out more about our loping and leaping wetland friends, and what’s being done to save them from territorial oblivion I spoke with two experts Lea Randall, an endangered species ecologist at the Calgary Zoo and Mark Gloutney with DUC, out of Ottawa.

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